History

OLD FACE, NEW FASHIONS

Submitted by Editor on Mon, 01/11/2021 - 13:57

Readers may remember that human remains were recovered last year during excavation of South Leith Parish Church.

Today, Trams to Newhaven have released facial reconstructions of how one of those excavatees might have looked in life during the late Middle Ages (below), and how she might look now if she were alive today (foot of page).

The same underlying skull appears throughout.

CONTROVERSY AS BROUGHTON PRIMARY OPENS

Submitted by Editor on Mon, 01/11/2021 - 00:12

In Issue 312 we reproduced an article from 25 November 1896 which looked forward to the imminent opening of Broughton Primary School.

Two days later, additional journalism in the Edinburgh Evening News looked back at the inaugural event, and in so doing revealed some familiar fractures over how limited public resources are allocated across the capital.

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BRIGHT WORDS IN THE DARKNESS

Submitted by Editor on Mon, 04/10/2021 - 12:44

An eye-catching, thought-provoking, and well-executed piece of street-art has appeared at the Tesco end of the Rodney Street tunnel. For the full effect, see the foot of this page.

The work, by Mark Tremaine Agbi Okata’, was commissioned by Sustrans UK to mark Black History Month. It is one of eight pieces across the country’s National Cycle Network, created to highlight Scotland’s role in the trans-Atlantic slave trade. It’s an admirable initiative, which we applaud.

BLUE, BUMPY, STRANGELY BEAUTIFUL

Submitted by Editor on Sat, 04/09/2021 - 05:52

Have you ever wondered about these paviours?

They skirt the northern and western sides of the inner footway outside Drummond Place Garden, and many examples have a peculiar blue-ish hue. The words read:

TEES SCORIA BRICK CO.

PATENT

One Joseph Wharton of Darlington patented a machine for making bricks, tiles, &c. from molten blast furnace slag (scoria) in 1877. They had the advantage of being tough, waterproof, and resistant to chemicals.

FULL CIRCLE AT THE BOUNDARY

Submitted by Editor on Sun, 29/08/2021 - 08:59

The pulley wheel shown in the photo here has emerged from recent tramwork excavations on Leith Walk.

Archaeologists will determine its significance, but to Spurtle observers it looks like evidence of the former cable-drawn Edinburgh tram system.

From 1899, it ran as far north as Pilrig Street, whereupon passengers would transfer to the more efficient electrically powered trams operated by Leith Town Council.

THE CITY DUST

Submitted by Editor on Sun, 01/08/2021 - 04:11

The following correspondence appeared in the pages of the Edinburgh Evening Courant in 1852 and 1856.

Some details may have changed in the years since, but the general problem and particular tone are unmistakably familiar to students of New Town waste disposal.

 

EDWARDIAN NEWS FROM THE MEWS, 29

Submitted by Editor on Sun, 25/07/2021 - 05:21

1909

 

EDINBURGH AMATEUR DETECTIVE’S CHASE.

CLEVER CAPTURE OF ALLEGED BURGLAR.

THE clever capture of an alleged Edinburgh housebreaker by an amateur detective came to light yesterday, when the accused, George Alexander Melrose, residing at Crown Street, Leith, passed the bar of Edinburgh City Police Court on a charge of housebreaking. Interesting circumstances surround the story of Melrose’s arrest.[1]

EDWARDIAN NEWS FROM THE MEWS, 28

Submitted by Editor on Sun, 18/07/2021 - 09:38

RELIGIOUS WORK IN EDINBURGH.

The number of social agencies in connection with the Church is increasing so rapidly in our midst that many good men are beginning to wonder when time will be found for carrying on the more serious business of the Chruch, viz., the evangelisation of the masses. Time and again we have directed attention to the formation of men’s clubs in different parts of the City.